Sunday, December 9, 2007

Solution to India's infrastructure deficit

Solution to India's infrastructure deficit lies with not only proper planning but the most important thing implementation. Proper budgets should be made for development of any kind of infrastructure,because if the budgets are not well planned and the estimation is wrong then the whole process will be a failure. Budgeting is the key to success and also the foundation.India being a large country and its quite difficult to cover every part of it at one time, so one should focus on the vital sectors.
Politics should be avoided from infrastructural development as one can invite private investors to participate or take it as a business deal. The government can keep conditions just as they are in FDI's as the pvt bodies can only invest upto a certain limit and the rest is to be invested by the govt. By pvt investors one means only Indian Comapnies should be allowed to participate. The approach should be like a business with social ethics attached with it. There should be fairness,transparency & accountability . The reason for the infrastructure not being upto the mark in India is that one has always considered it as a social cause by any of the parties.
Importance should be given to those areas where the development is immediatly required.India should impose proper tax regulations so that more revenue can be generated as a result more money can be available with the govt to invest in concerned areas for development of infrastructure.
-NAZISH RAHMAN

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Too often, occupational accidents are considered a price of progress in developing countries. but they also occur in advanced nations. Whether we challenge nature at thirteen thousand feet underground in a South African gold mine or thirty-nine thousand feet below sea level exploring for oil in the Gulf of Mexico or at three hundred thousand kilometers in space en route to the moon—accidents can and will happen despite the best safety regulations. Human beings make mistakes, and sometimes equipment fails. Mothers often protest that they were only distracted for an instant when their child disappeared. “Pilot error” is still the leading cause of airplane crashes!

Industrial, mining and, consumer safety should never be compromised for profits; neither should margins of safety where food and pharmaceutical products are concerned. Aircraft, space vehicle, and automobile manufacturing as well as the production of power tools and equipment are further examples of industrial safety challenges—as are consumer products, from toasters, to contact lenses, to cribs—especially imported cribs. Then there are procedural and processing standards that require constant upgrading in chemical plants and hospitals as technology advances. There are safety concerns regarding the very frontiers of science. These include the safety of our astronauts in space exploration, the safety of people downrange of sites from which military and civilian rockets are launched, and the safety of offshore and land-based drilling for oil and gas, to name but a few.

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Anonymous said...

There will be an increasing number of failures in critical infrastructure such as dams, bridges, power plants, electrical grids, water, sewer and garbage disposal networks, databases, air traffic control systems, etc. The global lack of adequate disaster warnings and outdated technical systems, (e.g., port security, border violation, air traffic control, etc.) will take decades to correct unless a real tragedy or serious system failure with widespread economic consequences forces a greater sense of urgency. The earthquake in Haiti, the Katrina hurricane, the Gulf oil spill, floods in the Midwest, and the Japanese earthquake and tidal wave catastrophes demonstrate how unprepared we are.

The average age of potable water systems in the United States is seventy-seven years, and every two minutes a major water main breaks causing significant property damage. Yearly, three-hundred thousand water-main failures are already causing water shortages, and the problem will only get worse. It will require hundreds of billions of dollars to replace—not just repair—the thousands of pipelines crisscrossing our continent, but many of our states and municipalities are nearly bankrupt. Just as serious, the United States is in a global race for innovation in this information age yet is last in internet speed and security among developed nations. That is just incredible.

Infrastructure failures will compound the problems caused by an economic collapse but are also one means of employing workers to minimize a depression. When survival is at stake, people can be motivated to secure and improve their own towns and neighborhoods as well as the surrounding areas for a minimum wage. The problem at present is that the country is bankrupt and unless foreigners buy our debt, we can only pay in scrip. During recovery from a national disaster, workers are often paid in food and/or essential supplies so that government funds can be stretched. Idle labor conscripted for infrastructure repair is not paid the high wage scales of better times, but its employment must provide genuine humanitarian aid to stricken families.

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